Jeff Nock Iowa

Christian Values in Business, Jeff Nock Explains How They Can Help Any Organization

Jeff Nock 

IOWA CITY, IOWA— In today’s polarized world, it is often challenging to share one’s beliefs as inevitably those beliefs will inspire some and upset others. Jeff Nock is a Christian and has learned through many years of business leadership that utilization of Christian values can be beneficial to all business leaders regardless of religious belief.

Jeff Nock is an experienced executive, consultant, and leader with a demonstrated history of growing startups, nonprofits and established companies. Skilled in strategic plan development and execution, business plans, leadership development, marketing, Sales, finance and presentation development, Jeff has a strong, well-rounded background with a Master of Science in Management.

No surprise, given the topic of this article, Jeff Nock is a committed Christian blessed with four children and a long-standing career as an expert in growing companies. He is motivated to work long hours to see his business thrive as the Bible teaches to utilize the gifts people are given to help others. He also understands that he has been given an awesome responsibility of being a parent and utilizes time management skills to ensure he is there for his children when they need him and is the best possible leader for his family.

Jeff Nock asks shouldn’t the following biblical values be at the core of all company cultures?

Love – Do I demonstrate true compassion for my fellow workers, customers, clients, and partners?
Joy – Do I maintain the attitude that regardless of the current circumstances, everything will work out in the end?
Peace – Do I calmly go about my work- or do I “rant and rave” or “get upset” when things don’t go smoothly?
Patience – Do I maintain an attitude of “allowing people to grow” or do I demand they “have it all together” right now?
Kindness – Do I genuinely treat others with dignity and respect?
Goodness – Do I really have the best interest of others in mind when I talk and work with them?
Faithfulness – Do I speak the same of others when I am not with them, as when I am? Do I put in an honest day’s work?
Self-Control – Do I maintain the discipline to do my job with excellence? Am I pro-active or do I act re-actively? Do I take personal responsibility – or do I blame others or allow myself to be a “victim”?

Jeff explains, “In the end, whatever your religious beliefs, these values will enable you to be an empowering leader who is respected by your team. This doesn’t mean that difficult decisions should be avoided but it does mean those decisions should be made within the filter of these values. The leader of the organization is responsible for the culture of the organization. Whether you are Christian or not, you have a responsibility to set the example by living your own values in your daily work.”

Jeff Nock is CEO & Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC, which is a management consulting business that helps funded early stage and mid cap companies achieve their vision and growth goals by offering services that include C-Level mentoring, strategic planning, business planning, business model ideation/evolution, market analysis, financial analysis, competitive niche analysis, business development, operational efficiencies, and brand evolution.

Jeff Nock - Business Plan Development

Corporate Growth Expert, Jeff Nock Explains Business Plan Development

Jeff Nock, CEO & Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC. Prescient, which is a management consulting company that helps fund early stage and mid-cap companies achieve their vision and growth goals.

Jeff Nock - Blog 9
Jeff Nock

By offering services that include C-Level mentoring, strategic planning, business planning, business model ideation/evolution, market analysis, competitive niche analysis, finance, business development, operational efficiencies, and brand evolution.

 

While all companies should have a strategic plan that connects to each individual’s role in the organization, companies should only invest time in a formal business plan when there is a specific demand for that business plan.

 

Such demand could come from potential investors, banking institutions, potential partners and potential acquirers.

 

Since the strategic plan provides the guidelines for the daily, quarterly, annual and three to the five-year direction of the company, much of the content in the strategic plan will also be of value for the business plan.

 

Description

Jeff Nock understands that it is important to know your audience when writing a business plan. Before putting a lot of work in, ask the people who have requested the plan what they would like to receive.

 

In most cases, it is no longer necessary to write a 30-page business plan as it was many years ago.

 

In today’s world of bytes of information, it is important to be more concise. Often a 10 to 12-page plan will hit the mark. Highlight the following in one to two pages; Executive summary, company description, market analysis, competitive analysis, product/service description, marketing plan, sales plan, leadership overview, financial projections.  

 

Executive Summary

Write this section last. It summarizes, in one page, all the other sections of the plan. Make sure to emphasize the highlights as some readers will only read this section and the financials.

 

Company Description

Describe your business model. What problem or opportunity is your company addressing? What is your value proposition? Who is your target market?

 

Market Analysis

This section will show the reader that you thoroughly understand the industry you are planning to enter. Use data to show where the market has been and where it is going to be in the coming years.

 

Competitive Analysis

The last thing a potential investor or partner wants to hear is that you think you have no competition. Every company has competition even if it is the status quo. Educate the reader on who the leaders are in the industry and why.

 

Product/Service Description

Now that you have described your competitors, describe in some detail your product or service and be specific about how you differentiate from the competition. Why are you better than the rest? If you aren’t, you won’t be able to compete against existing, entrenched companies.

 

Marketing Plan

Marketing is your “one to many” strategy for how to establish your brand and drive interest in your product or service. Describe how you will establish your brand in the market and how you will get potential customers to believe in your value proposition.

 

Sales Plan

Sales are your “one to one” strategy for influencing potential customers to purchase your product or service. Describe how you will close prospects.

 

Leadership Overview

Often investors and partners go with a strong team of people even over a great idea for a product. Make sure to share who your leadership team is and why they are a great team.  Jeff Nock understands a company’s culture can be a huge key to future success. Describe your company culture and why people want to work hard to make your company and themselves successful.

 

Financial Projections

Share your revenue, expense and income forecast for the next year by month and for years two and three. Be pragmatic with these numbers.

 

You don’t want to be so conservative that the reader sees no potential in your company, but you don’t want to be so optimistic that you lose credibility with the reader.

 

Typically reviewers of business plans will cut revenue forecasts considerably.

 

Summary

When a business shares their business plan with an investor, vendor, client, or whomever they desire, they must be accountable for not only the successful outline of their initiatives but also their passion about the company.

 

The fervency of this passion is one of the most critical aspects of the business plan’s authenticity.

Jeff Nock - Startup Mentoring

Jeff Nock Highlights the Advantages of Startup Mentoring

CEO, consultant and startup savant Jeff Nock has worked for years to improve the output and success of small businesses and established corporations. He advocates mentors for startup businesses and discusses the potential for the improvement they bring.

 

Jeff Nock White Shirt
Jeff Nock

As CEO and Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC, Jeff Nock understands the importance of professional mentoring for all business leaders and professionals. For years, he’s helped startup, early-stage, and mid-cap companies grow and reach their goals through strategic business planning, business model ideation, and development. He has also seen the advantages mentors can bring to startups.

 

“Founders of startups are typically incredibly passionate about their new company.

 

Sometimes they are so close to their business concept that they can’t see the forest through the trees and can benefit from advice from an experienced business professional who has been there before,”  says Jeff Nock. “Mentors for startup founders can be found through their local Small Business Development Center (SBDC), area economic development agencies, through networking and by contacting successful founders that are farther along and willing to give back.

 

For startups, funding is limited so mentors don’t have to be paid for their advice. Just make sure to respect the person’s time and pay it back once you are successful. Successful local business owners will want to help start-ups succeed not only to pay back for the help they received in the past but because it makes the local entrepreneurial community stronger, which helps all.”

 

“Some start-up founders have never been part of the business before (college students or moving from a career outside the business) and other startup founders have had their hand in someone else’s start-up or been part of a product launch for a larger company,” says Jeff Nock. “The type of mentor each founder needs is dependent on what kind of experience that founder does NOT have.

 

Founders with no business experience should seek a business generalist who has a broad range of startup and business leadership skills.

 

Experience is Key, Says Jeff Nock

Founders with more business experience should seek out mentors who have skills in areas they lack experience. For example, if an engineer is starting a company they should seek out mentors with marketing, sales, and overall leadership experience.”

 

While aligning with a mentor who can help a start-up founder augment their experience is helpful, it is also beneficial to identify and learn from mentors from within the specific industry the founder is entering. Each industry has its own culture and mores and it is helpful for start-up founders to know as much about these industry nuances to save time and growing pains.

 

An experienced startup mentor will also be able to offer healthy network connections, having explored and made a name in the entrepreneurial ecosystem and industry already. In this way, they will be able to open many doors for a startup business and connect founders with people who can form win/win partnerships.

 

“Starting a business is hard work,” says Jeff Nock, “but learning the ropes from an experienced startup mentor will give these companies more traction to get up and running, helping them skip over the otherwise frequent pitfalls of learning the ropes on their own.”

Jeff Nock Shares Advice on Balancing Family and Work as Both a Father and CEO

Jeff Nock
Jeff Nock

As CEO & Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC, Jeff Nock understands the challenge of operating a business and maintaining responsibilities as a father at home. He shares with other business-centric parents what he believes to be the best methods of balancing work and family.

Both work-life balance and the traditional roles of parents at home have changed tremendously in the past few decades. Child-rearing isn’t delegated solely to mothers anymore, and an increasing number of mothers take on top roles in busy, demanding businesses. Some professionals choose to avoid having kids in order to put their careers first, but many more try juggling parenthood with steady work.

“It’s a challenge to designate enough time to both your family and work, but it’s not impossible,” says Jeff Nock. “While my kids will always come first, they also understand that I need to provide for them and that I enjoy my work. The key is good communication and scheduling. While the kids know I will be there for them, my business clients have to know they are a priority. Sometimes this leads to long days!”

Jeff Nock is CEO of Prescient Consulting, LLC and is compelled to work long hours to see his business thrive. However, as a father, he understands that at times a child’s sports game or graduation ceremony will take precedence over a business meeting.

“While business success is gratifying, our kids only grow up once and it happens so fast. I will do whatever it takes to coach or watch my kids in all of their activities while also making sure that our clients are happy. This can be accomplished by staying on top of the kids’ schedules and communicating with clients as to their deadlines and expectations,” says Jeff Nock. “In the end, you have to make sure the kids and clients know they matter.”

In the past, people have had to choose between their priorities, but today they can maintain family commitments as well as professional careers by relying on technology and new modes of communication to be present in multiple places at once. For instance, parents can spend needed time with their families while phoning in remotely through chat or video to important meetings when needed. Alternatively, if business trips take busy professionals out of town, they can use the same modes of communication to contact loved ones and spend quality time from afar.

As a CEO, Jeff Nock has come to the realization that a healthy work-life balance isn’t an end goal, but rather a balancing act that requires constant consideration of what’s most important on any given day.

“Sometimes you have to excuse yourself from work in order to be present for family events,” says Jeff Nock. “Other times you have to ask for forgiveness from your family if something at work is too pressing to put off until tomorrow.”

He concludes that positive communication is your ultimate ally in these circumstances and that there should always be an open dialogue between you and your work, and you and your family, so that both parties stay in the loop. This way, he says, you’ll seldom disappoint either.

Jeff Nock - Usefulness of Competitive Analysis

Successful Business Planner Jeff Nock Details the Usefulness of Competitive Analysis

Performing competitive analysis allows businesses of all levels the chance to observe competitors’ movements and gauge the effectiveness of their own strategies. Jeff Nock of Prescient Consulting, LLC shares his perspective on the usefulness of competitive analysis below.

 

Jeff Nock
Jeff Nock

Thorough market analysis is a necessary component of any successful business strategy. Success depends on how well a business sells its product or service, and comprehension of the market and potential competitors will inevitably factor into sales plans. Understanding what one company gets right and how another business fails can be interpreted and applied to improve any business strategy. In that way, companies can evolve and keep up with a changing market by using competitors’ results to enhance their own efforts.

 

“If you’ve developed a business plan in the past, then you’ve already conducted thorough research on your niche market,” says Jeff Nock, CEO & Founder of Prescient Consulting, LLC. “It’s just as important to explore the competitors within your niche and track their success or failures. This will allow you to anticipate shifts in the market and respond appropriately, among other useful benefits.”

 

A competitive analysis must include more than a subscription to competitors’ email lists and keeping an eye on their social media accounts. While these are very useful tactics, quality competitive analysis will include an all-encompassing strategy to monitor your competitors throughout various channels on an ongoing basis. Whether businesses choose to follow only a few of their main competitors or else study as many companies as they can is ultimately a strategy choice, which is likely factored by available manpower and resources.

 

However, Jeff Nock reminds businesses that the competitive analysis is not something to skimp on or dedicate only a small fraction of time to. Especially not with all the help available to businesses today.

 

“There are plenty of resources available online to help businesses monitor and track what a competitor is doing,” says Jeff Nock. “Subscribing to all competitor channels and online domains is easy. Companies can also use tools like those offered by Google to get detailed and accurate reports of competitors’ strengths and weaknesses in real time.”

 

Google is the world’s leading online index of professional services and they offer a range of complex tools (many free of charge) to help businesses keep a fresh and precise depiction of their markets. Google AdWords Keyword Planner informs businesses which keywords and phrases are trending online, how often they appear on competitor sites, and what their current bidding price is. Google Trends and My Business help companies link up their efforts with the successful trends sweeping a market at any given moment. Google Analytics, meanwhile, delivers a well-rounded snapshot of how users find and interact with a given website, allowing them to make alterations and test their success or failure.

 

“Competitive analysis will never fail you,” says Jeff Nock. “It’s a cheat sheet to your niche market that can empower your business and ensure strength and longevity over the competition. Refusing to conduct thorough market or competitor research will only hinder business potential.”